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What Would You Do for a Job?

There used to be a show on Nickelodeon called, “What Would You Do?” which gave the audience a chance to decide what they would do in a given situation. Welcome to Spark Hire’s “What Would You Do?”–job search edition. For this I pose to you the job seeker the question of what would you do for a job?

Here’s the scenario: You’ve been in the job search for a while but still you’re not finding success. As a job seeker you begin to question yourself and also think about what you can do to get yourself noticed.

Some will spend hundreds of dollars on networking events to get in front of the right person. Others will show up at an office to drop off a resume in person. Some job seekers move states, just pick up and leave to their desired location, in an attempt to find a job once there.

This job seeker’s mother is even offering a cash reward for the employer who hires her daughter. She passed out resumes to cars who stopped at her sign. It may be extreme, and likely ineffective, but it demonstrates the lengths job seekers will go to try and secure employment.

Some ideas raise ethical issues which may not just hinder a job seeker’s chance with a specified job, but their whole job search. There is always a line which cannot be crossed and it’s important to make that distinction before trying any wacky ideas. If you’re unsure, run it past your support system to gauge their opinion. Even simple ideas, such as going to a company in person, may be ill-suited for certain industries.

Out of the box ideas may be the right idea in a tough job market, but make sure you are willing to live and die by the idea, otherwise you’ll never have success.

So let us have it Spark Hire readers, what lengths would you go to get a job? And do you think job seeker antics–for lack of a better term–help people get noticed in the job search? Or are they a put off for potential employers?

IMAGE: Courtesy of Flickr by ross_hawkes

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Written by

Jen works as a Marketing Project Manager for a restaurant, a kitchen assistant for cooking classes, helps with database management, does some freelance writing, and more. She received her B.A. from the University of Maryland in Government & Politics in 2011. Currently, she resides in the Washington, D.C. area and is an avid sports fan.

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