How to Fight Employee Dissatisfaction

What costs business an estimated $300 billion per year in lost productivity? A recent Gallup poll points at rising employee dissatisfaction as the culprit. We all know an unhappy worker is an unproductive one, so how can you begin to boost employee morale?

Because employee satisfaction is necessary for high performance and productivity, it is crucial to acknowledge what is causing employees to be disgruntled on the job. A recent infographic revealed the top five reasons for dissatisfied workers. Consider the following before making thoughtful changes to your current company dynamic:

  1. Compensation
  2. Boss
  3. Job responsibilities
  4. Culture
  5. Commute

It is time to stop blaming the unrecovered U.S. economy as the reason for low employee morale. Though salary raises and bonuses may not be realistic at this point in time, there are many ways to give your employees the recognition they are so desperately seeking. When it comes to employee satisfaction and boosting productivity, employee perks are at the height of their popularity. Here are a few ways to curb employee dissatisfaction:

Listen and encourage

Making progress in meaningful work is the number one factor in motivating employees, according to a study by Harvard Business professor, Teresa Amabile, and independent researcher, Steven Kramer. Setting clear objectives, goals, and responsibilities allows your employees to understand the purpose of their work. Being rewarded along the way makes the time and effort fulfilling. Remember, as their accomplishments are made, even a simple “well-done” from a superior goes a long way.

Flexible summer hours

The summer months can be an unrelenting distraction as employees begin to envision how they would like to spend their time in the sun. Flexible summer hours have been a proven method of motivating your employees this summer, as well as producing positive results for your company. There are a variety of ways to switch up the working schedules such as shortened workdays on Friday or the option of working from home one day a week. The flexibility is sure to boost employee morale and productivity.

Social media policies

Although almost half of CEO’s prohibit the use of Facebook and other social media sites at work, considering social media as the largest distraction employees are faced with at work, there are potential benefits from enforcing a social media policy at work. A corporate wellness site Keas makes the case for Facebook. In moderation, short social media breaks make employees happier, healthier, and even more productive according to this new research.

Inform employees of new opportunities

Help your employees reach their career goals by informing them of new openings and opportunities within the company. Recruiting from within says a lot about your company and its values. By placing a high level of importance on promoting current employees, internal talent will continue to develop. Let your employees know their potential and they will surely be motivated to reach their aspirations and produce high-quality work.

As a manager, keep your ears and eyes open to determine the satisfaction levels of your employees. Continue to stay solution oriented because happy employees are more important to business than ever.

Do you notice growing numbers of employee dissatisfaction at your workplace? What employee perks have you offered to boost employee morale?

Image Courtesy of ADW.org

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About Heather Huhman

Heather R. Huhman is the Career & Recruiting Advisor for Spark Hire. She writers career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets, and is the author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships: The Truth About Getting from Classroom to Cubicle (2011), and #ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010). Connect with Heather and Spark Hire on Facebook and Twitter.

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